UCT Staff Member Injured in Jammie Shuttle Collision

Share this postEmail this to someoneShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

 

By Mantwa Mehlape

This article is exclusive to the Online Edition 3 of VARSITY News.

 

A University of Cape Town staff member was recently injured in a Jammie Shuttle accident and was sent to the hospital for recovery.

 

Immediately after the collision – which occurred on Friday, 30 March – paramedics stabilised the scene and brought the worker to the hospital. UCT has extended its support to the staff member’s family and the Jammie Shuttle driver.

 

The accident has led to discussion on issues that some students encounter with the operation of the Jammie Shuttles.

 

While the buses are a convenient form of transportation for many UCT students, some students complain that the buses are sometimes overcrowded with passengers.

 

“UCT should add on more Jammie’s because it is very uncomfortable…having to stand in a Jammie,” said Karabo Ntondini, an economics student at UCT.

 

Part of the reason for the occasional overcrowding in the shuttles is that some Jammie’s arrive late to their destinations, especially during times of high traffic, throwing off the schedule. This issue is experienced particularly by students with classes at Hiddingh Hall in downtown Cape Town, where afternoon traffic increases lead to many shuttles arriving late to UCT.

 

Zama Mkhize, an art and performance student, said the late arrivals were so drastic that she sometimes ended up ordering Uber’s to Upper Campus to arrive on time.

 

Mkhize said that her classes at Hiddingh Hall often end at 10 p.m. Given that the shuttle to Tugwell Hall on campus takes approximately 25 minutes and she must then walk or take an Uber to her residence in Rosebank, having Jammie’s arrive late can force her to arrive home at late hours in the night.

 

 

Another issue some students have expressed with the shuttles is that many of the buses opt to stop at North Stop on upper campus without stopping at South Stop.

 

“North Stop buses are more prioritised than South Stop Jammie buses,” said Riang Dlamini, a humanities student at UCT.

 

Share this postEmail this to someoneShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *